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The McCain Campaign Enters the Self-Parody Stage

You just can't make this stuff up:

Madam President, the amendment before the Senate is a very simple one. It restricts the use of campaign funds for inherently personal purposes. The amendment would restrict individuals from using campaign funds for such things as home mortgage payments, clothing purchases … and vacations or other trips that are noncampaign in nature. […]

The use of campaign funds for items which most Americans would consider to be strictly personal reasons, in my view, erodes public confidence and erodes it significantly.

Who said that? John McCain. In 1993. You know, when he was still standing up for the American people. Not when his party was footing the bill for his VP's wardrobe to the tune of $150,000.

Now, a certain regular here will say something like "they're both so bad". Which is true to a degree. But this is just patently wrong. This crap defense that the clothes will be donated to charity is bull. Really? All the clothes purchased for the Palin kids and Todd Palin are going to be taken back from them and given to... who, exactly? And if that was always the intent, how stupid does your campaign staff have to be not to use that as a selling point? Seriously, how hard is it to say "Gov. Palin's clothes for tonight's debate were purchased at a union shop and will be donated to the Salvation Army after the event." Bam! You got union points and a photo-op the next day.

Face it, you got caught; suck it up, apologize and move on. Don't bullshit us with some idiotic story about charities and donations? Nevermind that the purchase of those clothes may actually be illegal under US Tax Code. Oh, and the best part? Guess who pushed that section of the tax code into law?

John McCain. (See Section 313, para (b), sub-section (B)) [see also: original Senate bill, overview of S.27, bill's complete history]

Idiots. I don't want McCain to win, but this is pathetic. At least stand for something. At least have the balls to tell your party when they're wrong, not repeat the same stupid excuse and defend an apparent violation of a bill you sponsored.

Senator McCain, I wanted you to be the nominee in 2004. I wanted to vote for you so badly then. I even watched you this season, hoping you really weren't the stooge for the Bush administration that you appeared to be in the years following, hoping I could vote for you this time. But I can't, and I'm getting close to giving up on Republicans in general.

I really believe that you think you're doing the best thing for the country. But by allowing the political players to game the public in an attempt for votes, you're sacrificing every shred of integrity and, dare I say it, status as a maverick you've built over the last 20+ years as a Senator.

As Christopher Buckley said, "I haven’t left the Republican Party. It left me."

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