11 August 2015

The Google Trap

In light of yesterday's abysmal experience with Google Photos, I've been examining how much of my digital life is tied to Google. It's a sobering list:

  • Mail
  • Calendar
  • File storage (mostly taken care of)
  • Blog
  • Chrome
    • Search history
    • URL history
    • Profiles
    • Bookmarks
    • Remote Desktop
  • Identity management on dozens of sites
  • Contacts
  • Chat
  • Map location information and saved addresses
  • Video search and viewing history
  • Social media (sort of)  (deleted) (spoke too soon; damn Youtube)
That leaves music, books, notes, and music to other services. I have had a Google+ account, but rarely used it even before Google started dragging Plus out behind the shed. I prefer to use Twitter, which comes with its own set of issues; that's a different day.

It's odd to contemplate a digital life without Google; I've had a Gmail account since at least 2005, but have imported email that goes as far back as 2001. The stuff I did prior to that have been lost, frankly, and I can't imagine losing more.

It's also odd to find the tendrils that have moved outward from my Google account over the years. Apple is a good example. When I bought my first Apple device, I was prompted to get an iTunes/iCloud/iSomething account and, naturally, used my existing Gmail address. Years later, that has now proven to be a somewhat permanent choice. I can change my ID to something else, as long as it's not Apple.

My approach to analyzing how to move away from Google products was to isolate the things I use to the individual service I get it from, as much as possible. The thought with Apple was to have a @icloud email address and do my Apple business under that. There goes that idea.

So, now I have to figure out what to do. Fastmail seems to be the go-to, for-fee service for mail, but I'm the jerk that wants a custom domain. So now I'm paying for mail hosting, a domain, and the headache of having to keep that working.

I get the value of Gmail and Google services; I'm a long-time customer. The Google Photos issue has shown me, though, that all that data in one bucket is dangerous and potentially increases my risk profile. I'm not sure I can accept that anymore. Now it's a value proposition against my own time and effort. At least Google has my laziness on its side.

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